New Study Unravels the Effects on Body After Short Space Flight 

Jared Isaacman and Hayley Arceneaux. Credit | AP
Jared Isaacman and Hayley Arceneaux. Credit | AP

United States: Space tourists undergo some body transformation processes that astronauts who have been in space for two or more months are known to endure. 

Several of them were mostly restored to normal once the amateurs got back to the surface, as researchers found. 

More about the finding 

A group of studies on potential health risks of space traveling to the molecular level has been studied on four ‘space tourists.’ 

The results provide a better understanding of how the Earth residents, who are not trained astronauts and do not spend years on preparation for space missions, feel and react in a weightless environment and under space radiation exposure, the researchers noted. 

New Study Unravels the Effects on Body After Short Space Flight. Credit | Freepik
New Study Unravels the Effects on Body After Short Space Flight. Credit | Freepik

According to Allen Liu, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of Michigan, who was not part of the research, “This will allow us to be better prepared when we’re sending humans into space for whatever reason,” as US News reported. 

Though NASA and other global scientists have assessed the effects of space expeditions on astronauts, including those on yearlong residents of the International Space Station (ISS), space tourists have not been given much attention. 

The first space tourist to the space station was in 2001, and there are more chances of private space travel now. 

A three-day chartered flight in 2021 allowed researchers to investigate the so-called microgravity-induced increase or the rate at which the human body adjusts to space travel, added Susan Bailey, a radiation scientist at Colorado State University involved in the study. 

Crew member Jared Isaacman. Credit | AP
Crew member Jared Isaacman. Credit | AP

Analyzing bio samples of space tourists 

The four passengers on the SpaceX flight, known as Inspiration4, collected their own blood, saliva, skin, and more while in space. 

The samples were examined by researchers, and as expected, found several variation of numerous proportions in cells and alteration of immune system. 

All of these changes stabilized in months after the four had been home for a couple of months, and the authors determined that the short-term exposure to microgravity did not appear to exert major negative effects on the body. 

According to the researcher and co-author Chris Mason with Weill Cornell Medicine, “This is the first time we’ve had a cell-by-cell examination of a crew when they go to space,” as US News reported.